Two FTF Photos in Top 250

Iceout, Lost Lake

Further To Fly Photography has placed two landscape photographs in the top 250 nature shots of 2017, judged by the North American Nature Photographers Association (NANPA). The group’s annual “Showcase” competition attracts three to four thousand photo submissions annually from hundreds of the world’s top nature and wildlife photographers. Both photographs will be publish in NANPA’s “Expressions” presenting the competition winners.

“Iceout on Lost Lake” is a sentimental take on the passing of Winter into Spring in the high peaks of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. Intricate detail of a submerged, snow-covered log contrasts with a snowy sunset reflected in the patch lake waters. Finding this photo required a cold, snowy exploration of muddy lakeshores, trusting that the perfect composition would eventually reveal itself.

Iceout, Lost Lake
Iceout, Lost Lake

“First Light on Fall Creek” is a scene from the beautiful Swan Valley region of eastern Idaho. Fall Creek flows east out of the Caribou Mountain and cascades fifty feet directly into the Snake River. This photograph, taken in February at the first light of dawn, highlights the veil-like waterfall in the yellow morning sun while the surrounding river remains cold and blue.

First Light at Fall Creek
First Light at Fall Creek

Fall Creek sees its share of visitor in summer warmth, but virtually no one comes by in the winter to crash through the brushy, snowy riverbank in search of the perfect shot. In Winter, the rising sun catches the falls perfectly, the creek is full and the waters crash, creating a completely different picture. An exposure of about five seconds expresses the multiple water channels best.

Alfred Lambourne Prize Finalist

Panorama, White Rock Bay

Further To Fly’s panoramic photograph, “Earth, Air, Wind, Fire,” an image of the Great Salt Lake in winter, is a finalist for the Alfred Lambourne Prize in visual arts, which will be awarded by the Friends of the Great Salt Lake on September 16. The public is welcome to attend this annual celebration of the lake and the arts — see attached invitation.

Lambourne Prize 5x7 postcard
Lambourne Prize 5×7 postcard

Photo Series: Antelope Island in Winter

Afternoon, White Rock Bay

A large, salty lake in the desert might seem the most monotonous of subjects, but in fact the opposite is true. The Great Salt Lake in the western USA has a way with light that produces myriad colors and shapes — it becomes a palette from which to paint endless scenes, both real and abstract. In winter, the effect is exaggerated, as if the observer has stepped off of Earth and onto another planet.

Panorama, White Rock Bay
Panorama, White Rock Bay
Bridger Bay, Antelope Island
Bridger Bay, Antelope Island
Promontory Point from Antelope Island
Promontory Point from Antelope Island
Moody Clouds, Great Salt Lake
Moody Clouds, Great Salt Lake
Beach at White Rock Bay, Antelope Island
Beach at White Rock Bay, Antelope Island
Afternoon, White Rock Bay
Afternoon, White Rock Bay
Winter Afternoon, Great Salt Lake (mono)
Winter Afternoon, Great Salt Lake (mono)

Antelope Island Sunset

Panorama, White Rock Bay

The Great Salt Lake, Utah,  is in an ideal geographic position to play host to spectacular sunsets all year around. It backs up to the tall Wasatch Mountains, where clouds driven by prevailing winds stack up. But in the direction of the setting sun is  the vast salt pan known as the Salt Flats with its clear skies and long vistas, giving the red rays a direct shot at the mountain clouds. The result is the brilliant orange and red clouds and alpenglow for which western US sunsets are famous.

This setting is Antelope Island on the eastern side of the Great Salt Lake, specifically White Rock Bay. I especially like winter sunsets, because the snow picks up the red light so well and contrasts it with dark rocks. Here recent storms have left pools of water on the sand, nicely reflecting the glowing orange clouds. A perfect evening in an unusual place.

Now Available — Fall Creek, Swan Valley, Idaho

Falls Creek Swan Valley

Further To Fly Photography announced a new series of striking landscapes from Swan Valley, Idaho, USA, where Fall Creek plunges over travertine terraces into the Snake River. “Early Winter on Fall Creek” shows the falls in an unusual dark mood, with saturated colors struggling to be seen on a misty, gloomy afternoon.

St. Basil’s Cathedral, February

St. Basil’s Cathedral seems out of place in Red Square, next to the Kremlin, Moscow’s superlative Medieval fortress. Admittedly, with its garishly-painted towers, turrets, and domes, it seems out of place anywhere on Earth, except perhaps Barcelona. It is said to have evolved from a group of churches that sprang up around the grave of a local saint. Another story claims it was designed to resemble a bonfire, a cone of flames leaping to the sky. I’m not sure it requires explanation.

I have a secret spot from which I photograph St. Basil’s. It provides a much better view that the usual Red Square tourist snapshot that everyone brings home. I’m not telling where it is, but an enterprising photographer could probably figure it out. This strange February afternoon, with warm sun streaming low and a break in the freezing cold, It seems to fit in, if only for a short time. (Price Schedule F)