Photo Series: Get the Red Out.

Wave Monochrome 1 Spring Salon

Are the famed red rocks of the southwest USA always better in red? It depends on what you want to see. Here is my study of the The Wave, rendered in monochrome. Tell me how it succeeds — or not.

Wave Monochrome #11
Wave Monochrome #11
Wave Monochrome #10
Wave Monochrome #10
Wave Monochrome #9
Wave Monochrome #9
Wave Monochrome #8
Wave Monochrome #8
Wave Monochrome #7
Wave Monochrome #7
Wave Monochrome #6
Wave Monochrome #6
Wave Monochrome #5
Wave Monochrome #5
Wave Monochrome #4
Wave Monochrome #4
Wave Monochrome #3
Wave Monochrome #3
Wave Monochrome #2
Wave Monochrome #2

Breaking Wave, Monochrome

Wave Monochrome 1 Spring Salon

“The Wave” is a sandstone rock formation in northern Arizona that is a frequent photographic subject. It is in the backcountry, several hours’ hike from the nearest road, and the government stewards do not permit camping. For that reason most of the photos from here are taken at midday and are rather ordinary because light is harsh and blue when the sun is high.

For the sake of art, I broke the rules and stayed overnight because I wanted to explore this site in the warm, dim, flat light of dusk and dawn. The results justified my wanton lawbreaking, I think, producing a hue and flatness that highlights these formations’ abstract qualities. Later I explored black and white versions of these images and found them compelling in the way they translate the compressed layers of sand into movement and energy. Enjoy the sublime and improbable wildness of “The Wave!” (Price Schedule A)

Breaking Wave

“The Wave” is a sandstone rock formation in northern Arizona that is a frequent photographic subject. It is in the backcountry, several hours’ hike from the nearest road, and the government stewards do not permit camping. For that reason most of the photos from here are taken at midday and are rather ordinary because light is harsh and blue when the sun is high.

For the sake of art, I broke the rules and stayed overnight because I wanted to explore this site in the warm, dim, flat light of dusk and dawn. The results justified my wanton lawbreaking, I think, producing a hue and flatness that highlights these formations’ abstract qualities. Enjoy the sublime and improbable wildness of “The Wave!” (Price Schedule B)

Last Light, Cannon Beach

I just love the term “Last Light” and I undoubtedly use it too much in describing certain sunset photographs. It refers to the very last stages of the sunset, when most of the scene is dark and just a few elements of the picture still have that dim, orange rapidly fading light. I like it because is a natural way of editing what was a complex scene into just a few simple elements. This is a challenge photographers encounter in nearly every photograph. In the studio, it is an easy problem to solve, but when nature is operating the lights, things often seem out of control.

A photograph such as this one, in which the last light is the best possible light, paring the scene down to a beautiful simplicity, is a huge victory. It doesn’t happen every day. (Pricing Schedule D)

Wave, Three Textures

Wave Textures

“The Wave” is a sandstone rock formation in northern Arizona that is a frequent photographic subject. It is in the back country, several hours’ hike from the nearest road, and camping is not permitted by the government stewards. For that reason most of the photos from here are taken at midday and are rather ordinary because midday light is harsh and hot blue.

For the sake of art, I broke the rules and stayed overnight because I wanted to explore this site in the warm, red, flat light of dusk and dawn. I was very pleased with the results. I think I captured these phenomenal natural abstractions in their best light, so to speak. I especially like this shot because it studies the contrasting texture of the sandstone, and ignores the broad scenes which usually come from this amazing place. (Price Schedule E)

Cannon Beach Evening

Cannon Beach is an easy drive from Portland, Oregon, and is famous all over the USA as one of the finest beaches on the left side of the continent. So, where are the sunbathers? Where are the kids and their sand pails, the lifeguard stations, the hot dog stands? This is summer, after all.

Well, it’s not that kind of beach. Many first-time visitors to this part of the Pacific don’t realize the water is very cold, all year around. North of San Francisco it’s also very stormy, and shipwrecks are common. Waves, big waves, pummel rocky cliffs. The brave divers and surfers who venture out wrap themselves in rubber and still come out with frostbite. But on the other hand, all of those things are necessary to assemble a memorable scene of wave, rock, forest, cloud and sun like this one. This is not a sunbather’s beach, it is a photographer’s beach. (Pricing Schedule D)

Breaking Wave

“The Wave” is a sandstone rock formation in northern Arizona that is a frequent photographic subject. It is in the backcountry, several hours’ hike from the nearest road, and camping is not permitted by the government stewards. For that reason most of the photos from here are taken at midday and are unfortunately ordinary because midday light is harsh and blue.

For the sake of art, I broke the rules and stayed overnight because I wanted to explore this site in the warm, red, flat light of dusk and dawn. I was very pleased with the results of this wanton lawbreaking, capturing these phenomenal natural abstractions in a unique light. Enjoy the sublime and improbable wildness of The Wave.